Steely Dan cover from their 1977 album Aja. A top 20 Billboard hit in 1978. @darrengarrett  on vocals, @michelefortunato on trombones. Other instruments and production by me, @steve2k2. This was very difficult, and I had to play the guitar lead in parts. Impossible for mere mortals to do that one!

This is not clearly explained in the manual, but I found a nice guy willing to help on YouTube.

Check out the video here. In the Replies is more information on the mapping which I will try to repeat here.

You will need the Controller Editor, which came with your Mikro – you should find it installed or in the Native Access program. On my Windows 10 machine it is here: C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\Native Instruments\Controller Editor. You will need to open this in Administrator mode. I created a link on my taskbar.

First create new template and name it in the controller editor. Here a snapshot of mine (after I set it all up)

Then, select all the pads (shift click from right top to bottom left to select all). Once you do this , go to ASSIGN tab, then the action tab labeled “Press” and set Type to None.

In Superior Drummer 3, I selected the drum set I wanted and set up all the routing. Don’t forget to make sure you have set the MIDI input in your DAW to the MASCHINE Micro MK3 and also make sure your drums trigger on channel 10 if you chose to do that. Then once you are happy with your drum setup, save it as a project in your Superior Drummer. You can probably make this a default but I haven’t done that yet.

Now this is the lame but necessary part. You need to decide how you want your drums to be laid out in your head or write it down. You will need to go back and forth between SD3 and Controller Editor and change the values for each pad that matches the note values in SD3. In the Controller Editor you do this under ASSIGN>Hit tab, note. Use the format C0, NOT C-0, or you will be sorely disappointed.

In SD3 you find these notes by unfolding the “midi mapping tab on the right side of SD3. If you don’t see it, it is under the show pop down menu. make sure to unfold hamburger menu in midi mapping and view “show keys”

Now, select the individual drum with mouse to identify the value and punch that in to the controller editor.

Remember you can change the articulations of each drum but you will need to save it under: Mini in/EDrum Settings > Save as under user presets.

Make sure your MIKRO is in MIDI mode. It should show up in the little window on your MIKRO.

I did a couple of other steps as well. I set the MIDI channel to 10 on all of the pads and changed the color values. Here’s an example.

You should make sure the final template is save in the controller. You can call it up anytime you need it.

I use Sonar as my DAW (Free from Bandlab now!) – I’ve set up a nice template that has everything set up the way I like to start. If you do this you should have very little setup to do after you initialize everything.

A big thanks to Broken Bird Productions https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRNjeL7ftmQYVfXuqqiGjiA

Please check out his YouTube videos and subscribe.

Here is my colorful MIKRO setup

Here’s my current drum setup in Superior Drummer

This has been the bane of my existence, but I came across a post that showed how to do it. I am capturing it here for any poor lost intrepid souls.

If you have a tempo map that you spent hours, yea, days to perfect, you can move it to a new project. I wanted to do this so that I could update an old project to a new template. Here’s what I found out:

Load the MIDI file containing your source tempo map into Sonar as a new project.  Then open up the tempo map to make sure it’s actually in there.

Then Select All and then hit ALT-CTRL-C (Copy Special) and make sure that only “tempo changes” is ticked. Hit OK.  Now the clipboard should now contain the tempo map

Then open up the project that you wish to merge this tempo map with.  Move the NOW to the start of the project.  Hit ALT-CTRL-V (Paste Special).  Make sure that the Tempo Changes is the only event type ticked.  (All other event types should be greyed out as the clipboard should only contain tempo change events)

Note, you may need to open  up the tempo view before doing the Paste to make sure there are no existing tempo changes that would confuse the project.

Hit OK

Open up the tempo view and your tempo map should be present there as pasted.

This cover is the Dave Edmunds version. Me and my Bandlab buddies @thelonewulfproject and @mojoespage.

Dave Edmunds _11.jpg

Here’s an updated cover of the Beatles Fab Song called Because from Abbey Road. @kiwichrys from Bandlab helps out with some vocals here.

I added the bass line to this Bandlab collab with @beatledrex. Maybe I’ll update it with more instrumentation at some point.

Stephen Weber posted this on Drooble. It is a pretty cool idea. Zoom in for detail.

Here is a write up of how to interpret sample rate and beats per minute. An example involving 5/4 time is also included to demonstrate the concept.

You should be able to see the document below, but if you can’t, here is a link.

Here is an audio sample. It starts with 4 beats, then plays 5/4 for 4 measures then ends with 4 beats.